NOW Telecom supports telco industry liberalization, welcomes Dito Telecommunity » Manila Bulletin Technology

Manila Bulletin Philippines

Breaking News from the Nation's leading newspaper

Tempo

Online Newspaper

Showbiz and Celebrity News

Sports News

World News
News Asia

NOW Telecom supports telco industry liberalization, welcomes Dito Telecommunity

Updated

Kristian Pura, NOW head of business development

Rodolfo Pantoja, president of NOW Telecom

NOW Telecom welcomes the liberalization of the Philippine telecom industry with the entry of a new telecom player that hopes to provide better internet for the country. 

Asked on the entry of the new player, Rodolfo Pantoja, president of NOW Telecom said: “We see the entry of DITO Telecommunity (formerly Mislatel) as a net positive for the industry. It provides a market signal that government is in the liberalization phase of the telecommunications industry. This will ultimately benefit the consumers as the increased competition will stimulate improvements in quality of service, increase in service coverage and availability.”

Dito, the consortium of Davao City-based businessman Dennis Uy, was recently awarded a certificate of public convenience and necessity (CPCN).

NOW Telecom, which was able to renew its congressional franchise under Republic Act no. 10972 last year, is currently offering broadband internet access in Metro Manila, through a fixed wireless microwave transmissions network. This enables NOW to provide guaranteed internet speeds, of up to 2.40 gigabits per second (Gbps) to its enterprise customers. 

This technology sets the stage for the full rollout of 5G by utilizing millimeter wave (mmwave) which exponentially increases internet speed and bandwidth capacity to subscribers, reaching up to 20 gbps in network capacity. 

With the growing global popularity of mmwave for 5G, NOW is confident that it can adopt new use cases, ICT applications and least-cost deployment solutions in the Philippines. These new technologies will leverage the high speed, low latencies and high capacities that mmwave and will open new markets that NOW can more readily tap because of its ability to provide wireless connectivity.

NOW has connected more than 400 buildings in Metro Manila with each building capable of providing coverage of up to 2km radius focusing on enterprises and multi-dwelling units such as commercial and residential buildings. The key to NOW’s growth is the combination of its innovative technology, business strategy, and the economics behind the model.  

“We are the largest fixed wireless access provider in the country.  And we maintain that vision as we provide guaranteed broadband to our customers – both enterprises and residential buildings. We will leap frog from this model and provide new generation technologies including 5G. Deployment plans are underway to serve the greater Metro Manila,” according to Kristian Pura, NOW head of business development.

When asked if NOW Telecom is open to partnership with DITO Telecommunity, Pantoja meanwhile said that NOW remains confident and steadfast in its proven strategy of providing  guaranteed broadband to enterprises and is determined to expand its service offerings to new geographical markets. 

“Part of this strategy is our willingness to entertain possible partnerships with other telecommunications companies. We are always open to explore opportunities of partnership and collaboration with other players in the industry, to both local and foreign players. The same can be said to DITO Telecommunity. The decentralized gigabit era will inevitably force disruptive innovations in this industry. Specializing in a specific market niche and partnering with the right entities are both essential in delivering profitability,” he explained.

Related Posts

By the Associated Press  Soon, you could get fewer familiar ads following you around the internet — or at least on Facebook. [caption id="attachment_727720" align="aligncenter" width="1024"]FILE - In this July 30, 2019, file photo, the social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple's App Store. Facebook is launching a long-promised tool that lets users block the social network from gathering information about them on outside websites and apps. Facebook said Tuesday, Aug. 20, that it is adding a place where users can see the activity that Facebook tracks outside its service. If they want, they can turn it off. (AP Photo / Amr Alfiky / MANILA BULLETIN) FILE – In this July 30, 2019, file photo, the social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple’s App Store. Facebook is launching a long-promised tool that lets users block the social network from gathering information about them on outside websites and apps. Facebook said Tuesday, Aug. 20, that it is adding a place where users can see the activity that Facebook tracks outside its service. If they want, they can turn it off. (AP Photo / Amr Alfiky / MANILA BULLETIN)[/caption] Facebook is launching a long-promised tool that lets you limit what the social network can gather about you on outside websites and apps. The company said Tuesday that it is adding a section where you can see the activity that Facebook tracks outside its service via its “like” buttons and other means. You can choose to turn off the tracking; otherwise, tracking will continue the same way it has been. Formerly known as “clear history,” the tool will now go by the slightly clunkier moniker “off-Facebook activity.” The feature launches in South Korea, Ireland and Spain on Tuesday, consistent with Facebook’s tendency to launch features in smaller markets first. The company did not give a timeline for when it might expand it to the US and other countries, only that it will be in “coming months. What you do off Facebook is among the many pieces of information that Facebook uses to target ads to people. Blocking the tracking could mean fewer ads that seem familiar — for example, for a pair of shoes you decided not to buy, or a nonprofit you donated money to. But it won’t change the actual number of ads you’ll see on Facebook. Nor will it change how your actions on Facebook are used to show you ads. Even if you turn off tracking, Facebook will still gather data on your off-Facebook activities. It will simply disconnect those activities from your Facebook profile. Facebook says businesses won’t know you clicked on their ad — but they’ll know that someone did. So Facebook can still tell advertisers how well their ads are performing. Jasmine Enberg, a social media analyst at research firm eMarketer, said the tool is part of Facebook’s efforts to be clearer to users on how it tracks them and likely “an effort to stay one step ahead of regulators, in the US and abroad.” Facebook faces increasing governmental scrutiny over its privacy practices, including a record $5 billion fine from the US Federal Trade Commission for mishandling user data. Boosting its privacy protections could help the company pre-empt regulation and further punishment. But it’s a delicate dance, as Facebook still depends on highly targeted advertising for nearly all of its revenue. CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced the “clear history” feature more than a year ago. The company said building it has been a complicated technical process, which is also the reason for the slow, gradual rollout. Facebook said it sought input from users, privacy experts and policymakers along the way, which led to some changes. For instance, users will be able to disconnect their activity from specific websites or apps or reconnect to a specific site while keeping other future tracking turned off. You’ll be able to access the feature by going to your Facebook settings and scrolling down to “your Facebook information.” The “off-Facebook activity” section will be there when it launches. The tool will let you delete your past browsing history from Facebook and prevent it from keeping track of your future clicks, taps and website visits going forward. Doing so means that Facebook won’t use information gleaned from apps and websites to target ads to you on Facebook, Instagram, and Messenger. It also won’t use such information to show you posts that Facebook thinks you might like based on your offsite activity, such as news articles shared by your friends. Stephanie Max, product manager at Facebook, said the company believes the tool could affect revenue, though she didn’t say how much. But she said giving people “transparency and control” is important. Enberg, the eMarketer analyst, said the ultimate impact “depends on consumer adoption. It takes a proactive step for consumers to go into their Facebook settings and turn on the feature.” People who say they value privacy often don’t actually do anything about it, she said, so it’s possible too few people will use this tool to have a meaningful effect on Facebook’s bottom line.